Let’s be honest about Christmas

I was going to post a big post about Christmas. Then I realised I pretty much wrote one already, so I’ll post that and edit the new content to the bone:

I hate Christmas, more and more, but what I hate most is Atheists celebrating Christmas.

A few weeks ago in my daughter’s school, because they have a big Indian population, they decided to serve some special Indian food related to a particular festivity I don’t remember the name of. It sounded great! It was theirs, and a religious one too, so how much sense would it have made for me to celebrate that Indian festival just because it sounded cool and had good food and people did cool things during it? It would be a pisstake, wouldn’t it? Disrespectful? Unless of course I believed in the spirit behind it, whatever it was, then I’m sure it would have been ok for me to celebrate it.

Christmas is about the birth of Jesus, for Christians. For Atheists, Christmas is the fictional anniversary of the fictional birth of a fictional baby. For Capitalists and businesses, Christmas is about maximising their sales. Most people the Atheists are going to spend Christmas with DO believe in that Christmas, so are you are taking the piss out of them? Are you pretending to care so that the elderly people present are happy? There is some nobility in that. The less naive ones who know you are atheists accept you there according to a CHRISTIAN spirit of accepting everybody.

Christmas IS a Christian thing. Yes it coincides with hundreds of others, more or less, yes it was cunningly planned to coincide with pagan traditions, but the truth remains that we do not celebrate those pagan traditions (though I am very happy to have my very own personal Viking visiting me today, on Winter Solstice, an important date for him), or any others. At best, the Christian festival of Christmas allows us to have more automatic time off at a time when most people have time off and this can cause us huge amounts of stress as we decide who the hell to spend it with. Some of us (see: me) would rather use that time off sitting down through it and playing videogames all day and eating cheese on toast, and instead, NO!

At worst, the Christian festival of Christmas rubs into the face of all those who do not have friends or family who will spend huge amounts of money, love and heating on them (as per my linked post above), but will instead spend their money on humongous quantities of wasted food, money and drinks.

Leave Christmas to the people who believe in it, and have the guts to be what you believe you are: an individual with no religious attachments. Or, at least, accept you are just happily contributing to this immense capitalistic farce, happily deciding to spend your money on furthering it and consolidating it rather than, say, charities, and so on.

It makes no sense for people who know me to say Merry Christmas, because they know I am not a religious person. However, I receive it well, because I do respect this and all other religions, and am very happy for people to have a religion that makes them happy as long as they don’t impose it on me. But hearing people who are against religion say or do anything for Christmas gets my back up. You want to destroy all religions from the root of their existance? Then why partake in them and exploit their festivals and thus help reinforce and further them?

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One thought on “Let’s be honest about Christmas

  1. uh, no… where did you take that atheist dont need to celebrate christmas? don atheist celebrate when they get a degree? Dont atheist celebrate a marriage anniversary, or birthdays or a new car?
    Christmas is a religioous tradition that spun a cultural tradition, which now is prevalent regardless of religion. In Japan they celebrate christmas as much as we do. Because humans may need to have a day or two meant to be spent with parents, to take thir time and bring a present to someone that never would get any, be it a kid or adult. We need special days when the routine is lifted and you do “something special”, something to look forward, something with a clear pattern, something that will tell you “yeah, it’s this part of the year already”. The end of the year is near, summer is long past, you are weary, and now it’s time to celebrate for making it this far.
    Let christians go to the midnight mass, and celebrate baby jesus birthday. Ill stay home and wait for little Lolo to rip his presents wraps open and get all jumpy for the wonder. We all need traditions and celebrations, to have a root in our daily lives.

    I suggest you to watch this excellent TED video about purposes traditions and celebrations for atheists: http://www.ted.com/talks/alain_de_botton_atheism_2_0.html

    Oh, and merry Christmas.

    Like

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